3D Printing, Christmas, Programming

Today’s Functional Print, CHRISTMAS EDITION: Christmas Tree Feet

In today’s appropriately festive 3D printer news, I’ve printed replacement feet for some ornamental Christmas trees:

christmas-trees

These feet took a while to design — the organic shapes and border ridges were new concepts to me in OpenSCAD, but I was able to settle on a design that could be printed without supports.

feet

Spot the original, if you can!

The feet didn’t require supports, but this was only because I printed the “toe” separately and attached it with acetone afterwards. If I hadn’t done this, I would have had to print a bunch of additional support along the bottom of the foot.

feet-in-place

The trees are similar to OpenSCAD script and STL file are available on GitHub. Feliz Navidad!

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3D Printing, Programming

Today’s Functional Print: Wire Cube Plastic Connector

In today’s “hey, that’s actually useful” news, I’ve printed a connector for assembling wire cube shelving. The shelves are shipped as a stack of identical wire squares that come together with round plastic connectors, allowing you to build customized shelves, like this one:

wire-cube-shelving

We bought some at a garage sale, but we were two connectors short of a full set. I designed the replacement in OpenSCAD and printed each one in about an hour and twenty minutes.

connector-on-bed

The finished print with support material still attached.

connector-off-bed

After removing support material.

connector-in-place

Amazon sells 4-packs of these connectors for $6.44, so the retail value of this print was $1.61.

The OpenSCAD script and STL file are available on GitHub.

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3D Printing, Christmas, Programming

Today’s Functional Print: Christmas Light Clips

In today’s “’tis the season to be printing” news, I’ve printed replacement Christmas light clips.

single-clip

They took about half an hour to model in OpenSCAD, and each one can print in only three minutes. Their exact design appears to be unique to the decoration that they came from, but these very similar clips sell for $2.99 for a pack of 100, so each clip has a retail value of about three cents.

The clips are being used to attach lights to these festive holiday deer:

deer

Here’s a closeup:

deer-clip-closeup

Let’s play “Find the original clip!” It’s in there somewhere.

batch-of-clips

The OpenSCAD script and STL file are available on GitHub.

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3D Printing, Programming

Today’s Functional Print: Cootie Eyes

In today’s “is he posting about Cootie again?” news, I’ve printed replacement eyes for our Cootie game. The eyes are tiny and get lost really easily, so they are a natural candidate for replenishment.

cootie-o-clock

These eyes are so small that I had to dial the print speed down to 3 millimeters per second (from 30 mm/s) so that plastic would have time to cool before the next layer was added and so the motion of the printer didn’t tip over the eye as it printed the top of the peg.

cootie-eyes-in-place

That’s a face that only a mother cootie could love.

The OpenSCAD script and STL file are available on GitHub.

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3D Printing, Programming

Today’s Functional Print: Cootie Legs

In today’s “does that really count as functional” news, I’ve printed replacement legs for our Cootie game. You can’t buy replacement parts for Cootie, so the retail value of these legs is literally priceless.

bulk-cootie-legs

cootie

cootie-legs-closeup

These legs are low-polygon because I’m not yet experienced enough in OpenSCAD to replicate organic shapes. I generated these legs by intersecting the extruded x, y, and z profiles of an original leg, seen here:

original-cootie-leg

The OpenSCAD script and STL file are available on GitHub.

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3D Printing, Programming

Today’s Functional Print: Train Valve Gear

In today’s “how did I ever live without a 3D printer” news, I’ve saved a decades-old toy train from the trash heap by printing a new valve gear for its left side of its wheels. The train is a 1986 model New Bright toy train, and it was destined to encircle our Christmas tree, but a missing piece was causing the front left wheel to get lifted off the track by a dragging piston rod. It took about half an hour to design a replacement in OpenSCAD and an hour to print. Its value is immeasurable.

Here’s the component by itself.

wheel-bracket

And here it is in place:

train-engine

You might not be able to pinpoint it, since it fits so perfectly that it’s undetectable as an aftermarket add-on. Here’s a closeup:

wheel-bracket-in-place

The OpenSCAD script and STL file are available on GitHub.

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